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We Specialize in Quality Elk Products

 

 

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TRY ONE OF OUR  FAVORITE  RECIPES

BLUE CRUSTED ELK FILLETS

Chef Steven Lifter, Touchmark, Appleton, Wi

 

Elk Meatballs with Heritage Apple and Onion Compote

Jack Kaestner, Executive Chef, Oconomowoc Lake Club

 

ELK LOIN STEAK WITH MERLOT SAUCE

 

ROAST ELK BACK STRAPS

By Sheldon Boerner, Sous Chef, Hotel Mead

 

GRILLED ELK STRIP STEAKS WITH MUSHROOM/WALNUT SAUCE

 

SUSEN’S MEADOW CREEK ELK SOUP

By Dolores Berger,Diana's Mom

 

MOM’S COUNTRY ELK STEW

 

ELK ROLL-UPS

 

ELK PARMESAN

 

ELK LASAGNA - WISCONSIN STYLE

 

ELK GOULASH

 

 

 

ROAST ELK BACKSTRAPS

By Sheldon Boerner, Sous Chef, Hotel Mead

Prepare a seasoning mixture to use with the Elk meat.  My favorite consists of : ½ cup salt, 1 ½ teaspoons black pepper, 1 ½ teaspoons paprika, 2 pinches of celery salt, 2 pinches of oregano, 1 pinch basil, 1 pinch marjoram, 1 pinch rosemary, 1 pinch curry powder, 1 pinch tarragon, 1 pinch thyme, dash of nutmeg (I have a tendency to pinch big).  Mix thoroughly.

Rub the backstrap with a small amount of olive oil, minced fresh garlic, and seasoning mixture (I recommend doing this a day or two before cooking; it will help the flavors absorb into the meat).  Place the meat in a preheated 375 degree oven for approximately 15-20 minutes in order to get a good sear on the meat (or, you can also lay the meat on a charcoal grill just long enough to get dark grill marks [about 5-10 minutes depending on how hot the grill is], turning it so as to sear all sides.  Either way you do this, it will seal in the juices, which will help you achieve the result of a moist and tender roast.  In a commercial kitchen, I then place the meat in a slow-roasting cabinet (the same type used for Prime Rib of Beef) at a temperature of 250 degrees, and check the internal temperature of the meat approximately every 20 minutes until the meat reaches an internal temperature of 110 degrees (rare), and turn the cooking time control to “off,” and hold at 110-120 degrees.  Lacking a slow-roasting cabinet, the same results can be achieved by opening the door of your 375 degree oven for 5 minutes and lowering the temperature to 250 degrees, then closing the door and checking the temperature every 20 minutes until reaching 110 degrees.  The entire cooking process should take approximately 60-75 minutes for a backstrap of about 8-10 pounds.  When the meat is done, you can hold the meat at rare for about ½ hour or more by opening the oven door for 5 minutes and turning the heat off, and then closing the door.  Individual ovens vary a great deal, so slight time adjustments may be necessary for the result you want.

To serve the meat, remove it from the oven and place on a cutting board, slicing across the grain.  You may pour the pan drippings over the meat to keep it moist and add flavor, or serve a demi-glace with it (there are several companies that make decent “instant” versions of this sauce; the formal “from scratch” process is usually too painstaking and time-consuming for the average cook to undertake).  Or you can heat the pan drippings in a saucepan with a little water, and add a “slurry” of about 2 tablespoons flour briskly whisked into ½ cup cold water (no lumps!) to the drippings when it begins to boil.  Simmer for about 15 minutes to make a light pan gravy.